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Hazelnut

Documents

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Developing Hazelnuts for the Eastern United States Developing Hazelnuts for the Eastern United States

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Date added: 03/07/2008
Date modified: 03/17/2008
Filesize: 148.77 kB
Downloads: 1432

Keywords
Corylus avellana, Corylus americana, hazelnut, eastern filbert blight, Anisogramma anomala, breeding

Abstract
Over the last century, many advances were made in the art and science of hazelnut improvement that clearly show the potential for developing well-adapted commercial quality hazelnuts for the eastern United States. At Rutgers University, we are using these advances to build an efficient and effective hazelnut breeding program. New Jersey’s geographic location and climate make it well suited for assessing the major limiting factors of European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) culture in the northeastern U.S., which includes susceptibility to eastern filbert blight (Anisogramma anomala [Peck] E. Müller) and lack of cold hardiness. By utilizing previous eastern U.S. breeding efforts, access to a greatly expanded base of hazelnut germplasm, better understanding of eastern filbert blight, and recent advances in hazelnut genetics and breeding, it will be possible to significantly increase the usefulness of hazelnuts in New Jersey, the eastern U.S., and other climatically homologous areas.

Cracking the Mystery of the Hazelnut Cracking the Mystery of the Hazelnut

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Date added: 03/07/2008
Date modified: 03/17/2008
Filesize: 1017.6 kB
Downloads: 1522

Introduction

The senior botanist [Reed Funk] had some advice for the budding scientist [Tom Molnar]. "Pick a species to study, preferably one that is ignored." He know this would be the last student he would cousel in his long, acclaimed career.  "Find a problem with it, and work furiously on a solution as if you are racing against time."

Chip Bud Layering: An Easy Way to Produce Rooted Layers of Hazelnuts Chip Bud Layering: An Easy Way to Produce Rooted Layers of Hazelnuts

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Date added: 03/07/2008
Date modified: 03/17/2008
Filesize: 347.13 kB
Downloads: 1444

Abstract

Chip budding and layering are two well known plant propagation techniques that can be effectively used on hazelnuts. Combining these techniques and following the steps below will allow you to propagate hazelnut clones of your choosing, on their own roots, in just one season. You must be able to successfully chip-bud to complete this method of propagation. While not unduly difficult, chip budding does require some practice before one can be successful a high percentage of the time. After your chip bud has callused and a resulting shoot has grown for a couple months, the base of this new shoot must be treated with rooting hormone to initiate root development in a process similar to air layering. The shoot should then be allowed to grow attached to the rootstock until the end of the growing season.  At this point it is ready to be detached and repotted as a rooted layer.

Backyard Breeding: Hazelnuts Backyard Breeding: Hazelnuts

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Date added: 03/07/2008
Date modified: 03/17/2008
Filesize: 400.66 kB
Downloads: 1584
Abstract
Hazelnuts are one of the easiest of the northern nut species to use in controlled crosses. However, success requires following several basic steps. Since plant breeding is a long-term project it is most helpful to first do your homework on the species. This includes studying the literature and growing and observing the plants. From this you can develop appropriate breeding objectives, which are needed to make the most effective use of your time and resources. Next comes making hand pollinations between parents of your choosing, to subsequently grow the progeny and hopefully select seedlings that are an improvement over their parents (and other cultivars). A detailed guide to making hand pollinations with hazelnuts is described in this article.

Accelerated Screening of Hazelnut Seedlings for Resistance to Eastern Filbert Blight Accelerated Screening of Hazelnut Seedlings for Resistance to Eastern Filbert Blight

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Date added: 03/07/2008
Date modified: 03/25/2008
Filesize: 560.1 kB
Downloads: 1940

Introduction

An eastern filbert blight resistance screening technique was developed that reduces the time required to identify susceptible Corylus avellana L. seedlings from the previously reported 14 to 16 months after inoculation to 6 to 7 months.  To accomplish this, hazelnuts were harvested at maturity, treated with GA3, germinated, and grown for about 8 weeks ....

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